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Eyelash Extensions For Contact Lens Wearers: What You Need to Know


Eyelash Extensions For Contact lens wearers

Eyelash extensions have become increasingly popular over the years, giving people the opportunity to have longer, fuller lashes without the need for daily mascara applications. However, for those who wear contact lenses, the idea of getting eyelash extensions may be a bit intimidating. Can eyelash extensions and contact lenses coexist peacefully? Let's explore everything you need to know about getting eyelash extensions as a contact lens wearer.


What Are Eyelash Extensions?


Eyelash extensions are individual lashes that are glued onto your natural lashes to give the appearance of fuller, longer lashes. They are typically made from synthetic materials, although some salons offer extensions made from mink or silk. Eyelash extensions can last anywhere from two to six weeks, depending on the individual's lash growth cycle and how well they take care of their extensions.


Can You Get Eyelash Extensions If You Wear Contact Lenses?


The short answer is yes, you can get eyelash extensions if you wear contact lenses. However, it is important to keep a few things in mind before booking your appointment.

Firstly, you should always let your lash artist know that you wear contact lenses. This is important because they may need to take extra precautions during the application process to ensure that no adhesive gets into your eyes. They may also need to adjust their technique to avoid irritating your eyes.

Secondly, it is recommended that you remove your contact lenses before your appointment. This is because the adhesive used to apply the eyelash extensions can sometimes cause irritation, and if you have your contacts in, it can be difficult to rinse your eyes out properly.

Lastly, if you experience any discomfort or irritation after your appointment, you should remove your contact lenses immediately and contact your eye doctor.


What Are The Risks Of Getting Eyelash Extensions If You Wear Contact Lenses?


While it is generally safe to get eyelash extensions if you wear contact lenses, there are some risks to be aware of.


One of the biggest risks is the potential for irritation or infection. If the adhesive used to apply the eyelash extensions gets into your eyes, it can cause redness, itching, and even an infection. This is why it is important to let your lash artist know that you wear contact lenses so that they can take extra precautions during the application process.


Another risk to be aware of is that the weight of the eyelash extensions can sometimes cause your natural lashes to fall out. This can be especially problematic if you wear contact lenses because the lost lashes can get stuck on your lenses, causing discomfort and irritation.


Finally, if you don't take care of your eyelash extensions properly, they can become a breeding ground for bacteria. This can lead to eye infections and other problems, especially if you wear contact lenses.


How To Minimize The Risks Of Getting Eyelash Extensions If You Wear Contact Lenses


While there are risks associated with getting eyelash extensions if you wear contact lenses, there are also steps you can take to minimize those risks.


Firstly, make sure you choose a reputable salon that uses high-quality products. The lash artist should also be experienced and knowledgeable about applying extensions to clients who wear contact lenses.


Secondly, make sure you follow the aftercare instructions provided by your lash artist. This includes avoiding rubbing your eyes, using oil-based products near your eyes, and using a lash cleanser to keep your extensions clean.


Thirdly, it is important to avoid getting water near your eyes for the first 24-48 hours after your appointment. This means no swimming, showering, or washing your face near your eyes.


Lastly, if you experience any discomfort or irritation after your appointment, remove your contact lenses immediately and contact your eye doctor. It is better to be safe than sorry when it comes to your eye health.

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